6. The finale

SUBMITTED BY : Jesse Chargualaf
SUBMITTED BY: Dr. Michael Bevacqua
SUBMITTED BY: Dr. Michael Bevacqua
SUBMITTED BY: Dr. Michael Bevacqua
SUBMITTED BY: Dr. Michael Bevacqua
Anonymous Submission
Anonymous submission, illustrating government corruption
Submitted by: Independence Guåhan Whatsapp group
Submitted by: Independence Guåhan Whatsapp group
Submitted by: Independence Guåhan Whatsapp group
Submitted by: Independence Guåhan Whatsapp group
Submitted by: Independence Guåhan Whatsapp group
Submitted by: Independence Guåhan Whatsapp group
Submitted by: Independence Guåhan Whatsapp group
Guam has been dependent on the import of foods, we have lost touch and connection with the earth. in order to be independent, we must be able to be self-reliant as a community, that starts with food security. the picture above is a blind Veteran I was working with, receiving a class on plant maintenance through touch, smell and taste.
Submission by: Raymond Shinohara
Because of Guam’s political status, there is limited funding, services and resources helping Veterans on Guam. resulting in many Veterans struggling with physical and mental health concerns. I have been an advocate for the equitable and adequate health care for Veterans since 2015.
Submitted by Raymond Shinohara
Because of Guam’s political status, there is limited funding, services and resources helping Veterans on Guam. resulting in many Veterans struggling with physical and mental health concerns. I have been an advocate for the equitable and adequate health care for Veterans since 2015.
Submitted by Raymond Shinohara

The theme that sticks out the most is that there is a lot of emphasis on the negative effects of having been colonized by the United States of America. With the westernized influences that has corrupted the integrity of being a CHamoru. It has turned a people that was self-sustainable to being dependent on the imports of food and goods.

The CHamoru people have lost land, culture, language, native species of plants and animals and the list goes on. When will the CHamoru people see that we are losing who we are as a people of Guam?

Decolonization is happening. We need to be prepared to make the change and ONE PEOPLE…The CHamoru people.

Initially I thought I was going to get a bunch of pictures from all political statuses; but that didn’t work out. some people didn’t want to be affiliated with the pictures and some pictures were… not in good taste or irrelevant to the topic.

…but people were contributing to the conversation. It was awesome to just have people ask a question about what I was doing. they may have said they didn’t know and I was that first line to educate them on the differences on political status.

So when the time comes to make that change in our political status, we can move forward together.

Join the Conversation

6 Comments

  1. Hafa Adai Ray!

    I know many of the people who contributed to your project! They have done a lot of outreach and educate the community decolonization and Independence as a political status option. It would be interesting to know more of the common themes related in the photos you shared and what you learned in the process.

    Sar ginen Guåhan

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  2. Ray, Thank you for this education of Guam and for your advocacy, not only for self determination, but also for veterans on Guam. Both are such important issues. I’m also glad that your project led to opportunities to educate people on the different stances. Like you have said many times this term, education is the start. Getting people informed of the different perspectives is important. Now how does one galvanize this into one common perspective from which to move forward? Our struggles in Hawaii are a mirror of what is happening on Guam. Hopefully we can learn from each other and also teach and learn from indigenous communities internationally. Mahalo! Mike

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  3. Shino,
    Awesome post, being able to see how others (outside of our class) feel colonization has impacted them is really dope.

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  4. Raymond, your post was so informative and creative! I sincerely appreciate your project and its intention…hearing voices from the community, that’s what I feel we are all about as social workers–client-centered, strengths-based, social justice advocates. I loved it! Thank you!
    Looking forward to working with you in the future!
    Aloha no
    Napua

    Like

  5. Hello Ray,

    I really enjoyed the images and viewpoints from the different people and their perspectives around the topic. Some of the people you were able to get images from are people that I recognize in the community who are prominent members of the decolonization movement. That’s awesome that you have those connections! I also really liked your view of, “The CHamoru people have lost land, culture, language, native species of plants and animals and the list goes on. When will the CHamoru people see that we are losing who we are as a people of Guam?” I think once this is recognized, through as you mentioned throughout the semester, through more education, hopefully the CHamoru people will also remember the resiliency they have from many years of colonization and imagine and realize their inherent strength in that alone when faced with the fears that come with seeking independence.

    Until the next time,
    Aurea 🙂

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